Articles Tagged: botox for migraines

 

Botox: An Effective Migraine Solution

Posted on June 7, 2017 by Ella Fedonenko

June is National Headache & Migraine Awareness Month. Studies have estimated that approximately 29.5 million Americans suffer from migraines, however only 15-30% seek medical attention.

Migraines can affect men, women, and children, but they are more prevalent among adult women. The primary characteristics of migraines include intense and throbbing headaches that can last anywhere between 4-72 hours and are often associated with hypersensitivity to light and sound. Although the exact causes of migraines are not fully understood, studies have shown that hormonal changes, stress, and abnormal sleeping patterns could trigger a migraine attack.

Patients are diagnosed with chronic migraines if they have more than fifteen headache days a month and on at least eight of those days the headaches have classic migraine headache features.

Effective migraine treatments are available to prevent and relieve painful and debilitating symptoms associated with this illness. Botox is one of the FDA approved preventative therapies for patients suffering from chronic migraines. There have been a number of clinical studies conducted that indicate that Botox can reduce the number and frequency of migraine attacks and improve the quality of patients’ lives.

Your Laser Skin Care in Los Angeles specializes in Botox and Fillers injections, laser hair removal and IPL among many other services. Please call us at (323) 525-1516 or visit us online at www.yourlaserskincare.com to schedule a free consultation.

How to Know if Botox Will Work for Your Migraines

Posted on December 14, 2015 by Ella Fedonenko

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Many people still think of Botox as a cosmetic treatment only, when in fact the neurotoxin is used to treat many health concerns. Botox was FDA approved for migraine in 2010, and is also commonly used to treat muscle spasm, hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating), bruxism (tooth grinding) and more. As with all medications, FDA approval doesn’t mean Botox works on every person with migraine headaches. If you’re considering Botox for migraine, here’s how to tell if it’s likely to work for you:

Are your migraine headaches really tension headaches? In this case, Botox may not work for you. Many people suffer from both migraines and tension headaches. Botox can help by giving you two or more additional headache-free days per month.

Do you have a headache right now? Botox isn’t intended to make your current headache go away. Botox is considered a preventive treatment to limit the incidence (reduce the number) of migraines long term, while the neurotoxin remains active.

Will side effects affect you? Allergan, the maker of Botox, found that less than 10 percent of people have side effects from treatment. The most common side effect noted was neck pain. Neck pain, however, may be a sign that you have chosen an inexperienced injector. There are other, rare, side effects that you should discuss with your doctor before undergoing Botox treatment for migraines.

Are you worried about bruising? The chance of bruising can be reduced by choosing an expert Los Angeles Botox doctor familiar with using Botox for migraines treatment. In addition, following doctor’s orders to avoid aspirin, Vitamin E supplements and certain other medications before treatment helps prevent bruising.

Are you willing to stick with it? It may take up to 9 months for Botox to effectively diminish migraines. If treatment hasn’t produced results for you in that time, reevaluate it with your doctor. You might try other methods in addition to, or instead of, Botox, such as yoga, magnesium supplements, acupuncture or daily prescription of oral medications.

Can you afford it? You can check with your insurance company, since the treatment is FDA approved. If you don’t have migraines regularly, Botox treatment might be impractical.

To learn more about whether Botox for migraines is right for you, please call us at 323 525 1516 or visit us online at www.YourLaserSkinCare.com.